Newspaper Archive of
The Arlington Times
Marysville, Washington
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October 12, 1961     The Arlington Times
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October 12, 1961
 

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~The~-- August report of the County Dairy Herd l shows there were 63 herds with cows on test with an aver- of 948 pounds of milk and pounds of butterfat per according to A1 Estep, Agent. These official are compiled in ac- ~t~axlance with the rules and adopted by the Sno- County DHIA Board, ton State DHIA, ap- and supervised by the States Department of and Washington University. top herd in the small division was owned by Strand or Arlington, with pounds of butterfat average cow. Followed by Herman of Snohomish with 42.2, Klein of Marysville with Ed Beetchenow of Monroe 34.7, Wm. Boyden of Men- with 32.9. In the 26 to 40 cow division herds were owned by John of Granite Falls with Henry Graafstra of Marys. with 42.1, Mike Schons of with 42.1, T. A. Roetci- of Everett with "40.3, RicCi of Monroe with 39.8, Elliott of Arlington with and Sid Staswick of Ever- 38.8. Douglas of Snohomish high in the 41 to 60 cow with 44.7, followed by Farms of Monroe with Svend Larsen of Stan- with 42, Sno-King Farms Monroe with 42, A1 Craven Sons of Everett with 39.7, Rod of Stanwood with and Bernard Houck of with 37.6. EVerett Winter of Monroe high in the large herd di- with 47, followed by Bailey and Son of Sno- homish with 45, Peter Poortinga of Marysville with 44.9, Frank Bueler of Snohomish with 46.6, Lloyd Barker of Arlington with 39.8, Gerrit Kosters of Snoho- mlsh with 39, nad Laurence Broderson of MarysviIle with 38.7. The top produczing cow com- pleting a 305 day record during the month was aged cow own- ed by Everett Winter with 21,- 170 pounds of milk and 961 pounds of butterfat. Other high cows in this group were own- ed by Walt Spane, Cathcart Valley Dairy, Riverside Hol- stein Farm, Earle Bailey and Son, Oliver Nelson and Steffen Farm. In the two year old class the high cows were owned by Lloyd Hansey, Frank Bueler, Everett Winter, Earle Bailey and Son and Gale Wallace. Top cows in the three year old class were owned by Everett Winter, Lloyd Hansey, A1 Weis- haupt, Oliver Nelson, Gale Wal- lace, A. R. Knight and Olaf Strand. In the four year old class, top cows were owned by John Kempma, Stanley Ulmer, Svend Larsen, Gerrit Kosters and Riv- erside Holstein Farm. 0 Gospel Serwces At Woodland Special Gospel Services will begin in the V. F.W. hall at Woodland, (south of Stanwood on the Silvana road), Oct. 12, at 7:45 p. m. The services will continue every Tuesday and Thursday. The public is invited to attend and hear "The Best News," and "Greatest Story." 0 RUBBER STAMPS Arlington Printing Co. O Maybe you think there's no difference in Water heaters except the size of the tank. tT aint so. Natural gas water heaters are best "-and hem's why.. A gas water heater can give you MORE hot wa r-FASTER. Gas is the PDQ fuel- Powerful, Dependable, Quick. You'll have plenty of hot water for the automatic washer, dishwasher, and baths for the whole family. Your gas water heater will last longer,, too, and won't need costly repai . Why not treat youmelf to LOTS of hot Water? Call your authorized gas appliance dealer today. In Cooperation With EL PASO NATURAL 6AS COMPANY Wholesale Suppliers to CORPORATION gen~tng 44 Growing Communities in the Pacific Northwest ORDINANCE NO. 43g AN ORDIN~NC~ O~ M OF ARI~NGTC~, W&W~I~GT~q, f~x- trig and adopting Me bu~t of ttald town for the year 1~2 and levy~ therefor. BE IT ORDAINI~D BY ~ OOU~- CIL OF M TOWN OF ~O~q: Section I. That the l~udget for .t~ year 1962 as finally determlned ~nd mixed is in the followinS stm~ and amounts, to wit: CURRENT EXPENSE FUND Estimated Income Balance on hand .................... $5,000.00 Liquor Tax (2050x8.4~2) ........ 13,182.00 Motor Vehicle Excise Tax (2050 x 2.5095) ...................... 5,144.50 Fines & Licenses ........................ 6,000.00 General Taxes (6 mills on $1,699,123.00) ............................ 10,194.75 Dog Licenses ................................ 300.00 Telephone Franchise .............. S75.00 Building Permits ...................... 750.00 Plumbing Permits .................... 100.00 Use & Occupancy Permits .... 50.00 Gas Permits ................................ 50.00 P.U.D. Excise Tax .................... 1,000,00 P.U.D. Occupation Tax .......... 1,500.00 Transfer from Water/Sewer Fund in lieu of office ex- pense, etc ............................... 7,200.00 Transfer from Garbage Fund in lieu of office expense, etc. .. Trans f e r... ~r~i~ ...~i.~21~.~i~....i~i 3,600.1111 in lieu of office expense, eto ............................................... 2,100.00 Fire District No. 21 ................ 1,200.00 Ambulance service .................... 1,200.00 Rents .............................................. 180,00 Transfer from Cumulative Reserve General Fund ........ 3,398.25 $63.024.50 Estimated Expenditures General Government Dog Catcher Salary .................. $480.00 Dog Catcher Expense .................. 250.00 Deputy Clerk Salary .................. 3,480.00 Postage & Office Supplies .............. 1,500.00 Treasurer-Clerk Salary .................. 4,550.00 Insurance ................ 2,500.00 Attorney Salary..1,200.00 Special Building .. 300.00 Police Judge Salary ...................... 900.00 Civil Defense ........ 246.00 Building Inspector Salary .................. 1,090.00 Planning Commis- sion ...................... 1.500.00 Janitor Service .. 400.00 City Hall ................ 2,400.00 Health Officer ...... 100.00 Publishing & Adver- tising .................... 200.00 Street Lighting .... 4,800.00 Association of Wash- lngton Cities .... 112.50 Payroll Taxes ........ 1,000.00 Conference and Training ............ 200.00 $27,198.50 Police Protection Special Police .... $200.00 Police Salaries .... 14,760.00 Police Training & Conference ...... 300.00 Police Dept. Main- tenance & Oper- ation .................. 1,200.00 Patrol Car Expense .............. 1,000.00 $27,198.50 $17,460.00 Fire Protection Fire Calls and Drills .................... $3,000.00 Fire ]Dept. Training & Conference .. 400.00 Fire Dept. Main- tenance & Oper- ation .................. 2,533.00 Fire Dept. Pensions .............. 390.00 Hydrant Rental .. 450.00 $17,460.00 $6,773.60 Ambulance Service Ambulance Expense .............. $200.00 Transfer to Am- bul~nce Reserve Fund .................. 900.00 6,T73.60 $1,200.00 Library Service Transfer to Library Fund ....$900.00 Snohomish County Library Assoc. (2 mills on $1,699,123.00) .... 3,385.60 $1,200.00 $4,285.00 Parks Transfer to Park Fund .................. $1,000.00 4.285.60 $1,000.00 1,000.00 Transfer tO General Obliga- tion Bond l~demption Fund (Street Lights) ...... 1,261.25 Capital Outlay .......................... 3,845.55 $63,024.50 LIBRARY FUND Estimated Income Transfer from Current Ex- pense Fund ............................. M.00 Rentals .......................................... 100.00 $1,000.00 Estimated Expenditures Maintenance & Operation.... $I,000.00 $1,000.00 FIRE DEPT. CONSTRUCTION FUND Estimated Income Balance on hand ...................... $20,000.00 $20,000.00 Estimated Expendltares Capital Outlay ......................... $20,000.00 $20,000.00 AMBULANCE RESERVE FUND Estimated Income Transfer from Current Expense Fund ........................ $900.00 $I~)0.00 Estimated Expenditures Reserve .......................................... $900.00 $900.00 AIRPORT FUND Estimated Income Balance on Hand .................... $12,820.00 Revenue ........................................ 15,000.00 General Obligation Redemp- tion Fund Repay Loan ........ 910.00 $28,730.00 Estimated Expenditures Salarles .......................................... $4,440.00 Labor .......................................... 1,500.00 Payroll Taxes ............................. 250.00 Transfer to Current Expense Fund in lieu of Office Ex- pense, etc ................................. 2,100.00 Materials & Supplies ............ 2,000.00 Power .............................................. 300.00 Malnt. & Oper. Equip ............. 500.00 Capital Outlay ............................ 17,640.00 $28,730.00 WATER AND SEWER FUND Estimated Income Balance on Hand ...................... $15,500.00 Revenue ........................................ 66,000.00 New Connections ........ : ............ 800,00 Penalties ....................................... 400.00 Side Sewer Permits ... ............. 100.00 Relmburslbles .............................. 4,000.00 $87,700.00 Estimated Expenditures Salaries .......................................... $15,360.00 Labor .............................................. 900.00 Payroll Taxes .............................. 625.00 Utility Tax .................................. 1,200.00 Service Tax ................................. 400.00 Power ............................................. 3,400.00 Chemicals ...................................... 1,150,00 Materials ...................................... 2,100.00 Malnt. & Oper. Equip. and Plants .......................................... 4,200.00 Conference & Training ........ 2{)0.00 Reimburslbles ............................ 4,900.00 Transfer to Current Expense Fund in lieu of office ex- pense, etc ................................. 7,200.00 Transfer to Water/Sewer Rev- enue Bond Redemption Fund ............................................ 31,695.50 Transfer to Wa~er/Sewer Rev- enue Bond Reserve Fund.. 5,880.00 Capital Outlay ............................ 8,469.50 $87,700.00 STREET FUND Estimated Income Balance on hand ...................... $1,000.00 Gas Tax (2050x4.0402) .............. 8,282.40 General Taxes (7 mills on $1,699,123.00) .......................... 11,893.95 Reimbursibles ............................ 7,500.00 Justice of the Peace Fines .... 25.00 $28,701,25 Estimated Expenditures ..... 00 Salaries ....................................... "u,~'v. Labor ........ : .................................. 2,000.00 Maint. & {:)per. Equip ........... 4.000.00 Materials ...................................... 3,000.00 Reimbursibles ............................ 7.500.00 Equipment Rental .................... 300.00 Payroll Taxes .............................. 550.00 Capital Outlay .......................... 1,011.25 $28,701.25 1 ARTERIAL STREETS FUND Estimated Income ~ ~- 00 [ Balance on hand ...................... $~,t~u. l ~ Cent Gas Tax (2050x2.6973) 5,529.50 Estimated Expendttures merit ~mrl~tl ........~ CUM~'r~K lll4~ItV~ G~J~U~ FUND ~ted Income General Tam (2 mUlm o~ 81,e~A~,00) ............................ ~,~8~S 4~,~ W~ttmated Ez~enditurm Tran~er to Current Expe~ae Flmd for Capital Outl~ .... 3,3~.25 GARBAGE FUND Estimated Income Revenue ....................................... ~$12,000.00 Transfer from Garbage Reserve Fund .......................... 3,000.00 $15,~0.00 Estimated Expenditures Salaries .......................................... $5,1e0.00 Labor ............................................. ,500.00 Transfer to Current Expense Fund in lieu .of office ex- pe~me, etc ................................. 3,600.00 M~int. & Oper. Equip. & Dump ........................................ 1,300.00 Payroll Taxes ............................ 240.00 Servlce Tax ................................ 120.00 Transfer to Garbage P.eserve Fund .......................................... 1,080.00 Capltal Outlay ............................ 3,080.00 $15,000.00 i GARBAGE RESERVE FUND Estimated Income Balance on hand ...................... $560.00 Investments .............................. 1,440.00 Transfer from Garbage Fund 1,080.00 $2,080.00 Estimated Expenditures Transfer to Garbage Fund.... $3,0~0.00 $2,0~0.00 PARK FUND Estimated Income Balance on hand ........................ $100.00 Transfer from Current Expense Fund ........................ 1,000.00 Estimated Expenditures Labor ............................................. $500.00 Maint. & Ower ........................... 25.00 Capital Outlay ............................ 575.00 $1,100,00 GENERAL OBLIGATION BOND REDEMPTION FUND Estimated Income Transfer from Current Expense Fund ............................ $I,261.25 Special Tax Levy (2~ mills on $1,692,793.00) .................... 3,808.70' $5,009.95 Estimated Expenditures Interest on Bonds .................... $2,901.25 Bond Redemption .................... 1,000.00 Repay loan and Interest to Airport Fund .................... 910.00 Reserve .......................................... 258.70 $5,009.95 WATER & SEWER REVENUE BOND RESERVE FUND Estimated Income Balance on hand .................... $13,355.11 Transfer from Water & Sewer Fund ............................ 5,880.00 ARLINGTON HTS. Mrs. $. B. Nm man, GE 5-2329 Arlington Heights Im-: provemerrt Club met at their hall on Saturday evening with a good attendar~e. President Roy Richardson announced the appointments of Harold Bissell as building chairman and that of Mrs. Harold Bissell as Sun- shine chatrman for the coming year. Please call Mrs. Bissell if you know of any illness among your neighbors. A large group of parents of Boy Scouts and Cubs were in attendance. They were assured that the Improvement Club was happy to continue to sponsor the various youth organizations and that the club would wel- come the active participation of the parents. It was announced that the Ar- lington Heights Improvement Club will again sponsor a series of card parties at the hail, start- ing October 20 at 8:00 p. m. Pinochle is the choice of most players, but if you prefer a dif- lerent game, make up a table of your friends and come. All are welcome. Pinochle scores are kept for a 10 weeks series with prizes at the end for the highest scores. Smaller prizes are awarded at the end of each evening's play. M .A. Hartley will be chairman for the first series, with Mrs. Gordon Rath- ~un in charge of prizes and scores. These card parties have been the major source of income for the club for a number of years, and your support and at- tendance is solicited. Pack No. 40 Cub Scout Com- mittee will meet Thursday, Oct. 19, at the home of John King. Congratulations are extended to Gary Hansen on being instal- led as Master Councillor of Marysville Chapter of DeMolay on Saturday evening at the Masonic Temple in Marysville. Those attending from the Heights were his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Hanson, and his brother Lyle, his sister and family, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Lil- green, Kathy and Laurie, and Investments ................................ 5,649.89 from Arlington, his brother and Interest on Investments ...... 115.00] family, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne I Hanson and Cheryle. Alsd Estimated Expenditures [ present were Mr. and Mrs. Reserve .......................................... $25,000.00 Floyd Wagner, whose son, Carl, $25,o0o.00 was installed as Assistant WATER & SEWER REVENUE BOND REDEMPTION FUND Estimated Income Balance on hand ...................... $13,265.00 Transfer from Water & Sewer Fund ............................ 31,S95.50 $44,960.50 Estimated Expenditures Interest on Bonds .................... $22,835.00 Bond Redemption .................... 9,000.00 Reserve ........................................ 13,128.50 $44,960.50 Section 2. For the purpose of rals- ing the sum of $25,486.85 for the Curr~nt Expense Fund, Street Fund and Cumulative Reserve General Fund, as heretofore fixed and deter- mined, the Town Council of the Town of Arlington hereby makes, de- clares and levies the sum of $25,486.85 or 15 mills on the assessed valua- tion of said town against all the real and personal property within said town for the various funds here- tofore mentioned and all of which is to be raised by taxation upon the property within the said town. Section 3. For t~e purpose of rais- ins the sum of $3,808.70 for the Gen- eral Obligation Bond Redemption Fund as heretofore fixed and deter- mined, the Town Council of t~e Town of Arlington hereby makes, de- clares and levies the sum of $3,- 808.70 or 2~,~ mills on the assessed valuation of said town against all the real and personal property sub- Ject to bonds within said town for the fund heretofore mentioned and all of which is to be raised by taxa- tion upon the property subject to bonds within the said town. Section 4. This ordinance shall be in full force and effect after its pas- sage, approval and publication ac- cording to law. PASSED by the Town Council and APPROVED by the Mayor this 2nd Scribe Treasurer, and their daughter, Ruth. Mrs. Waylan Starr and Judith and Juanita Norman were also present. Mr. and Mrs. Bill Lilgreen and family recently moved from their home on the Heights to the junction of the Darring. ton Highway and the Arnot road, where they have taken over the Flying A service station. The Andrew Swanston home was a busy one over the week. end. Coming on Saturday were Mr, Swanston's sister and hus. band, Mr. and Mrs. Zeek Hol- bert, of Ellensburg, to spend the week-end. Coming on Sun. day to celebrate the birthdays of Mrs. Bud Valliant and Mrs. John Valliant, were Mr. Swan-' ston's sister and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Lindstrom, Mt. Vern- on. Other guests were Mr. and Mrs. John Valliant, Bryant, the Bud Valliant family, Arlington, accompanied by Tom Thomas- son, and Mrs. Harley Wester and baby son. Guests of the M. A. Hartley's and John Lilloren's from Satur- day until Monday were old d'ay of October, 1961. WOODROW WILI2~Z, Mayor. Attest: HELEN BERGAN, Clerk. Published Oct. 12, 1961. COUNTY COMMENTS By AI Eat~ Kenneth Gross, Extension Dairy Specialist, listed some hints for dairymen now that the major part of field work is com- pleted. They are .passed along for information of dairymen. It is a good time to do that building of a new loafing shed or calf shed you've been think- ing about. Considering loafing sheds for a minute, Ken advised dairymen to think about all the different types of buildings available before actually put- ting up anything. In Snohomish County a couple of dairymen have modified versions of loaf- ing sheds with individual cow stalls built into them. The cows still have ,the freedom of the loafing shed, and also enjoy the privacy of the individual stalls. And reports are that it saves bedding, too. That is certainly a big advantage in itself. Ken said caring for the young stock in the winter is just as important as caring for the producers. He says calves don't need much, but they do need something to cut the wind and rain. A long shed, open on the south with individual calf pens built in, sure does the trick nicely. And it's relatively low in cost, The cold doesn't hurt calves so much in the winter: as do sharp wind and damp pens. It's these cold, wet con- ditions that many times gives calves pneumonia. Many of you dairymen have cows freshening now, and it you have the space or can make it available, Ken advised put- ting the new calves right into an open shed. Almost in the ~ame breath, he went on to say the colostrum from a fresh cow is practically liquid gold. You can't sell it anyhow, and When you give it to young calves, you're just filling them with a host of needed vitamins and minerals. If you hqve the fa- cilities for freezing the left- overs, it's a good idea. It will keep just fine, and when you have a calf that acts a little sick he'll welcome that nutri- tious medicine. Many dairymen around the state are opening silos now-- both bunkers and uprights. Ken says most dairymen ease their cows onto this new type of feeding. They begin feeding a little hay when the pastures get short, and then start giving them a little silage. And this is certainly the right way to go friends, Mr. and Mrs. F. G. Ewens, Roseburg, O r e g on, where he is a prominent orch- ardist. They were on their re- turn trip from a vacation on Vancouver Island. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bissell, accompanied by Mrs. Doris Bis- sell and Mrs. J. D. Wood, Olympia, drove to Yaklma where they were the overnight guests on Saturday of Mrs. Wood's daughter, Mrs. Betty Toloiia. Mr. and Mrs. Bissell returned Sunday afternoon, leaving the others for a longer visit. They report a beautiful trip through the mountains, with all the fall foliage and some snow in Snoqualmle Pass. Mrs. Fred McDonald, former long time resident of the Heights, was a guest for a week recently at the Ed Chrisman home. Mrs. McDonald now makes her home in Yakima. Refresher For Graduate Nursesl A refresher course for grad- uate nurses will be offered Oc- tober 17 to November 9 by the University of Washington State League for Nursing. The course, conducted by Mrs. Regina Cleveland, R.N., is de- signed for nurses who have not recently been employed in nursing, to re-acquaint them with current nursing practice. Instruction will include trends in hospital care, team nursing, observationn and charting, med- ications and nursing care of about it. An abrupt change in ration can throw a cow pretty far out of line on the produc- tion curve. It's pretty import- ant, talso, to adjust the protein content in your grain mixture to balance out with the stored roughage. Ken brought out another im- portant point to think about before winter actually gets here. During the winter, mastitis can take off like a scared quarter- back. And if you don't have a good line of defense it can get way out of hand. That really knocks down profits. Generally it's improperly work- ing milking equipment and un- necessary barnyard udder in- juries that cause most of the mastitis trouble. By using good management practices--sterilizing equipment and picking up boards and rocks in the cow lot--you can keep mastitis causes to a mini- mum. Another real handy trick to help handle the milk sanitation problem in the winter is to clip the flanks and udders of cows. This keeps them cleaner, which in turn keeps the milk cleaner ---and that bacteria count stays down. The Arlington Time, 9 Thu.day, October ! 2, 196 I. medical, surgical, orthopedic, geriatric, obstetric and pedia. tric patients. Refresher students are assigned to general medical and surgical units for practice with opportunity provided to observe in other clinical areas. Refresher course students will meet Tuesday, October 17 from 10-12 a.m. and on October 17 at Harborview Hall, King County Hospital, 9th Ave. and Jefferson St., Seattle. Otherwise classes will be held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from I to 3 p.m. Ward practice will be from 8 a.m. to 12 noon at Ballard, General, Doctors, King County, Northwest Memorial, Providence, Swedish, University and Virginia Mason Hospitals in Seattle beginning Wednes- day, October 18. Graduate nurses eligible for licensing as Registered Nurses .... in Washnigton may enroll in the course. The fee is $15.00, pay- able in advance either by mail or between 9:30 and 10 a.m. on October 17. Further information may be obtained from the School of Nursing, University of Wash- ington, LAkeview 4-6000, ext. 3402. yourself with Safeco'8 money-saving "All-In-Otto" Homeowners Insurancel JERRY @ McAFEE'S Arlington Office GE $-4011 ( Where and how can you use Land Bank Loans on your ranch or farm? With a sound purpose in mind you can qualify in many, many ways: to buy land, livestock, new equlpment; to construct farm buildings; to pay taxes, refinance existing loanss pay debts; to install irrigation or improve land. And there am many reasons why Land Bank Loans are preferable: low interest cost; long tenm; prepayment without penalty; and hcltff~! treat- ment when you deal with man who kmow farming and ranchinff. YOU CAN 51 oOic*: i. IdaAo, Monta.s, GET A LAND BANK LOAN PED|RAL LAND BANK ASSOCIATION 2919 Wetm0re EVER ,TT, WASH. Alpin 2-S 3 Richard Rose, Manager s~mm ..~ :.,, ~ ....... ~.,~.k..~.,.~,..~.~ .~ ~. f" "~ ~" ~ ""c.,:.~. /, ,, With Thunderbird styling : : : Thunderbird power ; ; and quality craftsmanship that sets a new industry standard ... the 1962 Ford Galaxies give you every essential feature of far costlier luxury ears Swift as a rumor, silent as a secret, Galaxie '62 has the timeless distinc- tion and talent for travel of the Thun- derbitd that inspired it. Every quick quiet mile whispers: here is a new 9tandard of quality. And every luxurious detail confirms i~ This is the car that introduces twice- a-year maintenance. Routine service is reduced to 80,000 miles on many items such as major lubricatione, twice a year or 6,000 miles on the rest. We suggest you see the new Galaxie and Galaxie/500 0hown above) for yourseIL We are confident you will agree: it'9 poindem "~m.mm repay more--or settle for lesa mmmm~ Now... twice-a-year maintenance reduces semice ~o a rdnimum! FIFTH & OLYMPIC "Arlington'a ~temll F~d ~ ~ MI" ARLINGTON, WASH. PHONE GE 5.21 ~! i,I !i!i ,i it :! i <